Study Questions for Women of the Last Supper: 
(Included in the current Fourth Edition)

NoteResponding to just a couple of these questions per chapter will often 
be sufficient for meaningful study. For photos of disciple portrayals at Millie's church, click the tab for "Dramatization Tips."

1 – What new insights about each disciple and discipleship do you have as you focus on these story vignettes and their New Testament references at the end of the chapters?

2 – In a cross-reference Bible, review the Old Testament passages cross-referenced in some of the New Testament references applying to each disciple.

3 – In addition to what's mentioned in these disciple stories, what do you know from historical sources (like Josephus or Eusebius) or early Christian tradition and legend about each disciple? 

4 – Based on your knowledge or research, compare the Protestant, 
Greek Orthodox, and Catholic views of the disciple/s you're focusing on – 
for example: Mary, Jesus' mother, or John Mark, son of Mary of Jerusalem. Although doing this has interesting results, you may not be able to do this for all of the disciples named in this Last Supper book by Millie.

5 – What aspects of each disciple's believer-follower life would you like to emulate, or perhaps already do? And how has that transformed your life, or someone you know?

6 – What new insights about Jesus do you have from reflecting on his interaction with each of these disciples and the people around them?
  
7 -- In the 2000 years since the early days of Christianity and these disciples, do you think Christianity has changed? Explain.   
Study Questions

Millie released a Study Guide for her trilogy of novels at the IAHE Convention in Indianapolis in April. The questions below are included, plus more. The Trilogy Study Guide in paperback is available from Amazon.com or by mail (see Millie's Books page)
The Kindle version will be released by mid-July.

    A good online source of maps for the countries in Millie's books:
www.mapsofworld.com.
To enlarge, click on the country in the world map.

Study Questions for Hungry River: A Yangtze Novel:

1 – How does the "Historical Preface" of Hungry River add to your appreciation of the setting of the story? When did you read the Preface – before or after you read the novel or both? Explain.

2 – Comment on the importance of the “hungry river” imagery throughout the novel. Do you “love” and/or “fear” rivers like the novel’s characters? Explain.

3 – Have you visited China? If so, how does that increase your interest in Hungry River and its sequels? If you haven't visited China, does reading the novel make you want to? Briefly describe from experience or research one city you've visited or would like to (location, population, known for, etc.).

4 – Foot binding is no longer practiced in Asia (thanks largely to Christian missionaries), but what other types of “binding” (limiting) do females – and males – still suffer around the world? What are Christians and democratic countries doing about those evils, especially those involving children?

5 – Name and describe a character in Hungry River that interested you. How did this character help develop one of the novel’s themes? 

6 – Explain how Abbie’s Journals from the twenty-first century add to the storyline of her grandparents’ and parents’ time from a century earlier.

7 – Optional: Compose your own question about Hungry River and respond to it.

Bonus: Have a bit of fun commenting on your reading experience by making the two-word part of Hungry River's title into an acrostic – a word, phrase, or sentence acrostic. Keep your acrostic parallel: if you start with one word for the H, each letter in the acrostic must have just one word, and so on. 

Study Questions for Dragon Wall: A Great Wall Novel:

1 – Why do think author Millie chose this title for the novel? From what you know or from research, briefly describe China’s Great Wall. If you are artistic, enjoy drawing a sketch of it.

2 – Name and describe a character in Dragon Wall that interested you. How did this character help develop one of the novel’s themes?

3 – If you have missionaries or other overseas workers among your family and friends, share how that has informed your international and multicultural perspectives, and therefore affected your understanding of the missionary theme in Millie’s trilogy. If you don’t have missionaries (either past or present) among your family and friends, share what you know about missionaries and your opinion about people going out of their comfort zones to help others and tell them about Christianity.

4 – From research (or personal knowledge) briefly describe two or three belief systems or religions other than Christianity: such as Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Islam, paganism, atheism, Satanism, etc. 

5 – What have you learned so far from Hungry River and Dragon Wall about the Nestorian Monument and the Stone Ten Keepers? Are you curious to know more about them? Explain.  

6 – Author Millie uses photos throughout her trilogy from her family’s century-old collection. Do the photos enhance the plot and characters for you? Why or why not.

7 – Optional: Compose your own question about Dragon Wall and respond to it.

Bonus: Have a bit of fun commenting on your reading experience by making the two-word part of Dragon Wall's title into an acrostic – a word, phrase, or sentence acrostic. Keep your acrostic parallel: if you start with one word for the H, each letter in the acrostic must have just one word, and so on. 

Study Questions for Jade Cross: A Stone Ten Novel:

1 – One of the themes of Jade Cross is secret Christians. What did you learn from this theme in the novel? Are you sometimes a secret Christian? Explain.

2 – Name and describe a character in Jade Cross that interested you. How did this character help develop one of the novel’s themes besides the theme mentioned above?

3 – There are several important crosses in Jade Cross. Name two or three of them and suggest what they symbolize in the story.

4 – Why do you think there are more "Abbie's Journals" in Jade Cross than in the first two books of the trilogy? Do you keep a journal or a diary (either regularly or for special occasions like Abbie’s China Trip Journal) or do you plan to? Explain your response and/or compose a brief journal for your yesterday. 

5 – How does knowing the stories in this trilogy are inspired by author Millie’s own family’s experiences make you feel? Do you and your family have a story to share either in an article or a book? Explain.

6 – Author Millie has Comments, Notes, and a Newquist Family Timeline at the end of each novel. How do these historical elements help your understanding of the twentieth century? 

7 – Optional: Compose your own question about Jade Cross and respond to it.

Bonus: Have a bit of fun commenting on your reading experience by making the two-word part of Jade Cross's title into an acrostic – a word, phrase, or sentence acrostic. Keep your acrostic parallel: if you start with one word for the H, each letter in the acrostic must have just one word, and so on. 


From Millie's Author’s Comments at the end of each novel:

Fashioning a trilogy of heirloom story-quilt novels has been personally rewarding beyond all expectations! As I examined my family’s records and mementos long stored in my China boxes, I was deeply touched by the meaningful pattern in story that emerged from the memories – memories daring, tragic and joyous. But most importantly, my family’s story affirms the blessings of faith in God through Jesus Christ – a faith available to every person, in every country, of every millennium!
Above is the real-life family wedding photo behind Hungry River's story of Alfred and Meggie’s wedding. Meggie and Alfred (on the right) were author Millie’s parents, and in real life were Fred and Blanche (Ivers) Nelson. However, in real life, this was the wedding of Blanche’s sister Eva Ivers to Granville Bennett. Also in real life, Fred was the one who went on his brother's honeymoon to Iowa to visit their parents who had newly arrived in the States from China. So all true, just “rearranged” a bit.  :-) 
Little Abbie (author Millie in real life) poses proudly beside her Marine Corps  father. As Abbie/Millie writes in Hungry River's Prolog Journal, if the Chinese Communists had known about Alfred’s/Fred's U.S. military service and subsequent informing for the military, her family might never have left China alive in 1950. 
This 500-plus-year-old ancient jade (?) "bandit teapot" was given in gratitude to Millie's grandfather for saving a town with his gun from both ferocious Siberian wolves and killer bandits who called themselves "wolves." The story in Hungry River is like it happened in real life 
and as documented in Philip Nelson's memoirs. 
A pagoda photo from "Alfred's" old China collection.
This photo of one of Millie's mother's Bible classes for women in "old" China will help readers isualize bound feet. Look very closely at the feet of the second and third women from the right.The other three women's feet have been unbound, still small and painful, but not as crippling.
The Yangtze River story of "missionary-merchants" Nils and Lizzie Newquist (author Millie's grandparents) and their daughter Hilda (seated above) is told in Hungry River. 

Above you see a section of the Great Wall with one of its many towers, used for living quarters and warnings from tower to tower. The Great Wall was wide enough for at least six horses to travel side by side. For many centuries, it was one of China's main "highways."